State to sign MoUs with UP and WB

SHAKTI VAHINIBy Kelly Kisalaya in Times of India

Ranchi: Jharkhand social welfare and women and child development department is planning to sign memorandum of understanding with Uttar Pradesh and West Bengal governments to combat the problem of trafficking.

Social Welfare Department secretary of Jharkhand, Mridula Sinha, attended a meeting in Jharkhand Bhavan in Delhi on Tuesday regarding establishment of state rescue centre in Jharkhand Bhavan to support victims of trafficking and violence.

The meeting was attended by Sharmistha Das, joint secretary, department of social welfare, women and child development of West Bengal, Ministhy S Nair, special secretary, home, Uttar Pradesh, Rupinder kaur, member, Delhi Commission for Women, chairpersons and members of the child welfare committees across Delhi, Delhi Police and representatives of NGOs.

During the meeting, Mridula Sinha proposed the idea of signing of MoUs to the officials of UP and WB government, which was welcomed by all.

Sinha said, “The discussion was very positive and fruitful. The MoU will help all the source and destination states in exchanging information, increase mutual understanding among states, and enable rescue of girls from every state.”

The MoU would be on the lines of the MoU which was signed between Maharashtra and West Bengal government in 2014 to combat trafficking.

IMG_5592“The draft of MoU is being made and it will be finalised within a month or two. We will consider the MoU between Maharashtra and WB government and also add more points to it,” Sinha said.

An important point under this MoU would be sending the rescued girls immediately to their home state if they are found in any of the states which signed the MoU.

Rishi Kant, member of Delhi based NGO Shakti Vahini, who was present in the meeting said, “It is a positive step by the Jharkhand government and other states should replicate it. It is a good beginning but there is still a long way to go and all the stakeholders should come forward and support it.”

Meanwhile, a shelter home of social welfare department is to be inaugurated on Thursday in Ranchi in which rescued trafficking victims and women seeking shelter would be rehabilitated.

SHAKTI VAHINI PARTNERS IN TRAFFICKING RESOURCE CENTRE AT NEW DELHI

SHAKTI VAHINI PUBLISHED IN THE PIONEER

Children and Young Girls of the State trafficked to various parts of the nation can finally be traced at the earliest from the nation Capital. The Social Welfare Department has initiated a meeting with officers of West Bengal (WB), Uttar Pradesh Government and Delhi Administration as well as with NGO partners for setting a Trafficking Resource Centre at New Delhi on Tuesday.

Ranchi District Child Protection Officer (DCPO) Kala Nath has been appointed as the Nodal Officer of the Centre. “The meeting was called for two agendas. Firstly, to appoint a Nodal Officer for the upcoming Trafficking Resource Centre. It will help officials of various states and NGO representatives to get in direct touch with a concerned officer of Jharkhand whenever a child or woman of the state is rescued from other states like Haryana, UP or WB.

Secondly, it was held to strengthen the inter-state coordination for rescuing trafficking victims of Jharkhand,” NGO Shakti Vahini president Ravi Kant, also an Advocate of Supreme Court told

The Pioneer over a telephonic conversation from New Delhi.The meeting was an introductory session attended by Social Welfare Principal Secretary Mridula Sinha, Jharkhand Bhawan Resident Commissioner Uday Pratap Singh, Joint Secretary to the Government of West Bengal Sarmistha Das, Delhi Commission for Women member Rupinder Kaur, Delhi Legal Services Authority member, Delhi Police officers, Child Welfare Committee members, Ministry of Home officer, Special Home Secretary of Uttar Pradesh officer and representatives from NGOs BKS, Shakti Vahini and Save the Children.

SHAKTI VAHINI“The centre once established will help all the stakeholders of the Jharkhand government to accommodate the rescued trafficked individuals of the state from Haryana, New Delhi-NCR regions and Uttar Pradesh safely where the maximum cases of trafficking are reported,” said Ravi Kant.

Other Sources in New Delhi maintained several discussions related to the matter like promoting helpline number for the victims and steps to tackle the trafficking issue through a unified approach were done.

Save the Children State Programme Manager Mahadev Hansda informed indentifying a location for constructing the center is in process. “The Centre will work in two modes apart from trafficking. It will keep in regular touch with children aged below 18 years working in homes and organizations at New Delhi. In case, a child of Jharkhand is harassed by their owners in home or other places, immediate action will be taken against them. Moreover, rescued girls will be given vocational training in the centre,” he said.

Similar meeting of Jharkhand government officials is scheduled with Ghaziabad, Nodia and Haryana representatives in July. Sources informed that Chief Minister Raghubar Das is keen to begin the Resource Centre and had discussed on it with state officers posted in New Delhi during his recent visit to the national Capital.

“Lost and Found” website to find missing children

10609524_10152784314039123_1825989846660013043_nPUBLISHED IN THE TIMES OF INDIA

NEW DELHI : The government has launched a “Lost and Found” website to help families trace the tens of thousands of children in the country who go missing every year often abducted for forced labour or sexual exploitation and are never found. The “Khoya Paya”, or “Lost and Found”, website khoyapaya.gov.in was launched by Minister for Women and Child Development Maneka Gandhi, who said the portal would allow parents to register details of missing children and citizens to report sightings. The information will be shared in real time with police and state authorities, who are mandated to register the complaint and investigate the case. “It was felt that we could have this portal, where if a child goes missing, families can put the details and the picture onto Khoya Paya,” Gandhi said on Tuesday at an event to launch the website, which is the first of its kind in India. “Then if you see the child anywhere, you can upload information and then the police see if they can correlate it.” Around 70,000 children go missing every year in India, Gandhi said, citing figures from the National Crime Records Bureau. But only 73,597 children have been traced between January 2012 and April 2015, she added. Child rights activists and government officials say that many of the country’s missing children come from poor rural areas or urban slums where they are at high risk. “Most of the missing children are trafficked for labour, for sexual exploitation, abducted, or kidnapped … They could be runaway s from home, or simply be lost,” said a government statement. “This is the reason that it is not only important to get the information related to these missing children, but it is equally important that the information is exchanged speedily to locate the children.” It said that social media could play “a pivotal role” in the search for missing children, as it would mean faster reporting. Child rights activists welcomed the initiative and dismissed claims that it would only serve a small fraction of the country’s population, around 25 percent of whom are Internet users. “Even if people do not know how to use the Internet or have access, they can enlist the help of the village council members, an NGO, or local officials to register their case,” said Ravi Kant, president of Shakti Vahini, an anti-trafficking charity. “Many NGOs like ours have already being going out into communities where children are at high risk and informing people of Khoya Paya and how they can use it. It is a good step towards finding our missing children.”

One Day Consultation on Anti Human Trafficking , Missing Children and Crime Against Women & Children


SHAKTI VAHINI ROHTAK TRAINING
June 19, 2015
A one day Consultation was organized in Rohtak by Shakti Vahini in Collaboration with Rohtak Police on the issue of Human Trafficking on June 19, 2015. Police personnel from Rohtak range including the district of Rohtak , Panipat , Sonipat and Jhajjhar attended the consultation. Various stakeholders like the Child Welfare Committee, Child Protection Officers and Protection Officers attended the consultation organised at the IDTR centre Rohtak.
 
SHAKTI VAHINI ROHTAK TRAININGInaugurating the Consultation Mr.Shashank Anand, IPS SSP Rohtak asked the Police to ensure strict compliance of various laws on women and children. He said that combating Violence against women and children was a priority issue for the Police and requested all stakeholders and NGO to partner together in combating these social malaise prevailing in the society. He also spoke on recent changes in the law especially related to sexual assault of women and children. He appealed to all Police officers to be sensitive to cases of women and children. He also asked all the Police personnel to be very sensitive while dealing with cases of Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act 2000 and Protection of Sexual Offences against Children Act 2012.
 
SHAKTI VAHINI ROHTAK TRAININGMr Ravi Kant President Shakti Vahini and Advocate Supreme Court gave a detailed presentation on Human Trafficking in India. He explained the recent changes in Section 370 IPC which has criminalised trafficking in persons and also prescribed stringent punishment for the offence.
 
While speaking on Section 370 IPC he said that While the old section 370 of IPC dealt with only buying or disposing of any person as a slave the new section will take in its purview buying or disposing of any person for various kinds of exploitation including slavery. This provision includes organ trade. As the explanation further clarifies “exploitation” would also include prostitution. This is in addition to the ITP Act, 1956. The intention of the legislature in including “other forms of sexual exploitation” and “forced labour or services” can be read to address situations where the trafficked persons are used for pornographic purposes or services like massage parlours.
 
SHAKTI VAHINI ROHTAK TRAINING”Human trafficking has emerged as a serious issue as it has acquired the form of organised crime. In order to understand and prevent this social evil, governmental as well as non-governmental bodies along with law and order forces need to work in tandem.”
 
The issue of buying and selling of girls from eastern and Southern part of India to Haryana village is happening. The trafficking of girls and women is the ramification of female foeticide in Haryana. He adds.
 
Mr Shashank Anand , SSP Rohtak requested all Police personnel present to help in  “Operation Smile” Initiative on Missing Children which is to be launched from 1st July. He also discussed the initiative of Track the Child on Missing Children and the Khoya Paya initiative.
 
SHAKTI VAHINI ROHTAK TRAININGMr Shahsank Anand also shared that the Government of Haryana has notified Anti Human Trafficking Unit in various  Districts of Haryana. He also told the Police Personnel about 226 Anti Human Trafficking Units operating across India which are helping in Inter-state collaboration of Investigation in Human Trafficking Cases.

Battered and bruised, some return, some are never to be seen again..

Meets MotherBy N Sai Published in the DNA News

In the last of the three-part series, dna travels to remote villages of India’s ‘slavery belt’, some of the remotest and backward areas of Jharkhand. Rescued slaves and the parents of those who have never come back reveal what makes these tribals easy targets

Ranchi: The road to Jahupkokotoli village in the Maoist-hit district of Gumla is a contradiction of sorts. As the two-lane road snakes through the forests and rolling hills of the Chottanagpur plateau, bauxite-laden trucks are the only constant reminder of activity here. Yet the public transport to this part of Jharkhand from the state capital Ranchi is rickety. The only bus everyday is as uncertain as life in this extremely backward region of India. Despite the lack of public transport, thousands of tribal boys and girls from Gumla-Khunti-Simdega region, India’s unofficial ‘slavery belt’, are transported and trafficked to upper middle class and rich homes of Delhi. After a period of enslavement and unpaid forced labour, many return battered and bruised. Some are never to be seen again. Some still carry on.

In Jahupkokotoli, an aboriginal hamlet of 160 Oraon tribal families, 45-year-old Mathoo comes running with a picture of his 14-year-old daughter. “Help me find her. I haven’t seen her after she went away in 2007,” says Mathoo. His daughter would be 21 now, but Mathoo doesn’t know her fate after she was taken by a ‘placement agent’ from a neighbouring village to Delhi to work as a domestic help. Within two months, the agent sent Mathoo Rs 1000 as a payment for his daughter’s ‘services’. Next year, he called up the agent again to inquire about his daughter. “The agent said that my daughter had run away and that he did not know her whereabouts. I do not know whether she is dead or alive,” says Mathoo.

A few houses away from Mathoo’s is the hut of Hari Oraon. His 16-year-old daughter Pramila was taken by an agent to Delhi in early 2014. But she ‘escaped’ within four months and came back. According to her statement to police, Pramila was taken to Delhi by another woman of the same village in the promise of a better life. As soon as she arrived in Delhi she was escorted to a Shakurpur-based placement agency by an agent. They took her finger prints on a piece of paper and sent her to work as a domestic maid at three different homes in Delhi. Facing ill-treatment and not having been paid by any of her employers or the placement agency, Pramila escaped. Lost on the streets in Delhi, she begged another woman to take her home. The woman instead handed her over to the Delhi police. The Delhi police handed her over to a shelter home in the capital from where she was taken to Kishori Niketan, a rehab centre for trafficked women in Bijupara, Jharkhand. Finally in April 2014, she was re-united with her family. For her work as a domestic help in Delhi, Pramila wasn’t paid any money. “The police left her in nearby Bishunpur from where we picked her up and got her home,” says Hari Oraon. “She says she will never go back to Delhi.”

Off the road from Bishunpur lies the Dalit village of Hadiya Toli, literally translating into ‘wine village’. There is no road connectivity to the village and reaching here requires walking a kilometre on a dusty track. The name of 15-year-old Sarita alias Budhni evinces a peculiar response from the village men. “That Dilli-return?”, one asks with a wry smile. “Who knows where she is,” says another. “Ask her mother. She might know.” We find her mother working outside her hut and as the conversation about her daughter nears completion, she says, “Who will marry her now? Who knows what might have happened to her in Delhi?”

Sarita disappeared from her house in 2013 with five other girls after an agent in her village promised her lucrative money in Delhi. Sarita says, “I was promised a monthly wage of Rs 5000. After working four months for an agency in Motinagar in Delhi, I asked for some money. They refused and locked me up instead. I begged to let me go home. But they said I cannot go home before I completed five years. Then one day the police raided the place and they took me in their custody,” says Sarita. She was finally sent home in April 2013.

“There were other girls in that house. I do not know what happened to them. I did not even get the money for my work,” says Sarita. When asked about the nature of her work, Sarita maintains an uneasy silence. Sarita is lucky enough to be back in her village. Even though her village doesn’t have either electricity, drinking water supply or roads, she feels safer here than in any of Delhi’s slave holes.

Phulin Murmu, 18, however doesn’t want to return to her village. Phulin Murmu is not a name that would ring a bell. But when she was found burnt, battered and bitten in a house in South Delhi’s posh Vasant Kunj locality it made national headlines in October 2013. She was found in the house of Vandana Dhir, an executive with a French multinational. Murmu’s body bore hot girdle-induced burn marks, deep scars on the head and bite marks all over her body. She was forced to drink urine, prevented from using the bathroom and confined in the house in a semi-naked condition before being rescued. She was working unpaid for two years before being rescued.

DNA tracked her down at a rehabilitation centre in Khunti, one of the hardest hit districts of the slavery belt. She is being educated and trained at the Mahilya Samkhya Society, which she shares with around 30 other minor girls, many of whom are rescued slaves. Phulin can barely write her name, the scars still show on her face. But she details her three years of enslavement with a brave face and with no emotion. “It is for the first time that I am seeing her talk so openly. It seems she is recovering well from the trauma,” says Asha Kusum, the warden of the institution. The Mahilya Samkhya Society is wary of letting Phulin rejoin her parents in her village. They ask her father to come to town for Christmas. They don’t want to take a chance again. “Most kids are from extremely poor tribal families. Their parents will send them to Delhi for any small amount. Phulin is safe here – from poverty and from agents who would want to prey on her again. She is still scared inside. She will only get better,” says Ms Kusum

मानव तस्करी के खिलाफ खड़ी हुई शक्ति वाहिनी

d2524

PUBLISHED IN DAINIK JAGRAN

जागरण संवाददाता, सिलीगुड़ी:

मानव तस्करी अपने आप में एक जघन्य अपराध है। किंतु आज भी मानव तस्करी धड़ल्ले से की जाती है। कभी विवाह का प्रलोभन देकर तो कभी नौकरी देने के बहाने तस्करी की जाती है। खासकर बच्चों और महिलाआंे की तस्करी की जाती है। ऐसे में एक संस्था आगे आई जिसे शक्तिवाहिनी के नाम से जाना जाता है। इसकी स्थापना सर्वप्रथम दिल्ली में वर्ष 2001 में हुई थी। तीन भाइयों ने मिलकर इसकी स्थापना की थी।

जिसमें रविकांत इसके अध्यक्ष है। निशीकांत एक कार्यकर्ता और ऋषिकांत एक एक्जेक्यूटिव डायरेक्टर है। इसी कड़ी के तहत वर्ष जुलाई वर्ष 2011 में शहर में भी शक्तिवाहिनी नामक संस्था की स्थापना की गई। जिसका प्रमुख उद्देश्य था यहां से तस्करी की गई महिलाओं को मुक्त कराना। इस संबंध में संस्था से जुड़े निशिकांत का कहना है कि इन तीन वषरे में पूरे देश से आठ सौ महिलाआंे और बच्चों को तस्करों के चंगुल से छुड़वाया गया। जिसमें तीन सौ पचास महिलाएं बंगाल से हैं। जिसमें चालीस प्रतिशत बच्चियां है। इसी कड़ी के तहत रविकांत कहते हैं कि इस शहर सहित छह जिलों में संस्था द्वारा कार्यालय बनाने की जरूरत महसूस तब की गई। जब हम देखते थे कि अक्सर तस्करी की गई महिलाएं इस राज्य से जुड़ी होती थी।

खासकर पहाड़ी और चाय बागान इलाके की होती थी। ऐसे में हमलोगों ने निर्णय लिया कि जब यहीं से तस्करी की जाती है तो यहीं पर कार्यालय की स्थापना की जानी चाहिए। ताकि प्रकार की तस्करी को रोका जा सके। इस बारे में यहां के लोगों बताया जाए। 1संस्था से जुड़े दीप बनर्जी कहते हैं जागरूकता अभियान चलाने के लिए लिए ग्रुप बनाए गए है जो विभिन्न स्थानों पर जागरूकता अभियान चलाते हैं।

दार्जिलिंग जिले में पांच ग्रुप बनाए गए है। जो सुदूर ग्रामीण इलाकों में जाकर वहां के पंचायत प्रधान, अध्यापिकाएं सहित महिलाओं को लेकर बातचीत करते हैं। उन्हें समझाया जाता है कि वे शादी और नौकरी इत्यादि का झांसा देने वालों के चक्कर में ना आए। पुरी जांच पड़ताल करे। इसके साथ ही स्कूलों में जागरूकता अभियान चलाया जा रहा है। 1जलपाईगुड़ी हाई स्कूल, मारवाड़ी हाई स्कूल, कालियांगज गल्र्स हाई स्कूल, सिलीगुड़ी देशबंधु उच्च बालिका विद्यालय, शक्तिगढ़ बालिका विद्यालय, बाल्मिकी विद्यापीठ, एक्तिसियाल स्कूल, घुघुमाली हाई स्कूल, अठारखाई उच्च बालिका विद्यालय, इलापाल चौधरी हिंदी हाई स्कूल सहित अन्य स्कूलों में जाकर विद्यार्थियों को बताया गया है कि वे किसी प्रकार प्रलोभन में ना आए। अपने आसपास के लोगों को भी इस बारे में बताए कि इस प्रकार का गिरोह सक्रिय है।

इस मौके पर विद्यार्थियों को इस मुद्दे से जुड़ी फिल्म भी दिखाई जाती है। किस प्रकार से एक छात्र की सूझबूझ से एक लड़की की तस्करी होने से बच जाती है। हाल ही में अनुपमा खोजे नामक नाटक जक्शंन, एनजेपी, माटीगाड़ा, कोर्ट मोड़ सहित शहर के मुख्य इलाकों और सड़कों पर खेला गया। जिसमें दिखाया गया कि किस प्रकार की मीठी बातें कर फंसाया जाता है। जो इस प्रकार की बातें करे उनसे सावधान रहे। जिसमें अंकूर नाट्य गोष्ठी की सक्रिय भूमिका रही। इसके अलावा कन्याश्री योजना के बारे में भी जागरूक किया जा रहा है। जिसमें 13 से 18 वर्ष तक की कन्या इसका लाभ उठा सकती है। इसके अलावा बच्चियों को कक्षा आठ में इनरोल होना चाहिए। इस योजना के बारे में बताने का मुख्य लक्ष्य है कि इससे बाल विवाह पर रोक लगती है। बच्चियों को पढ़ने का अवसर मिलता है। इसके अलावा हर थाने में पैंपलेट बांटे गए हैं। हेल्पलाइन नंबर दिया गया है।नुक्कड़ नाटक के माध्यम से मानव तस्करी के प्रति बच्चों को जागरूक करते शक्तिवाहिनी के सदस्य।जागरण

Bring law to prevent human trafficking

mardaani01-jun24PUBLISHED IN THE HINDU

At a time when trafficking of women and children continues to be a major concern for policy makers in West Bengal, activists have launched a signature campaign highlighting the need for a legislation to curb the activities of illegal placement agencies operating in the State.

Activists cite instances of Chhattisgarh and Delhi where mechanism to regulate activities of placements firms have been introduced in recent past. Chhattishgarh, a State with significant tribal population, where migration and trafficking is common, has recently framed rules under the Private Placement Agencies (Regulation) Act passed by the State Assembly.

In the Capital after the intervention of the Delhi High Court, a notification was issued in September 2014 which provides for compulsory registration of private placement agencies operating there within 30 days.

“We urge the State Government to regulate the placement agencies operating here, form a committee to verify credentials of all placement agencies, define rights of domestic workers and ban employment of children by the placement agencies,” Rishi Kant, an activist with NGO Shakti Vahini told The Hindu.

Pointing out that the campaign has been endorsed by over 4,000 people on different social networking sites, Mr. Rishi Kant said the campaign is aimed to complement schemes like Kanyashree Prakalpa, a scholarship scheme started by the State government aimed at reducing drop out of young girls.

A compilation of the signatures will be presented to the State Department of Women and Child Development, Mr. Rishi Kant said.

Vinod Kumar Tikoo, a former member of National Commission for Protection of Child Rights, also supported the initiative. Mr. Tikoo, who has worked in Chhattisgarh and Bengal, said that in certain rural areas of Chhattisgarh there were graffitis by a number of placement agencies.